Is the Philippine English a standard English?

English is an official language in the Philippines, along with Filipino, a standardized register originally based on Tagalog (Gonzalez 1998). … English is an official language in the Philippines, along with Filipino, a standardized register originally based on Tagalog (Gonzalez 1998).

What is the standard language of the Philippines?

Two official languages — Filipino and English. Filipino, which is based on Tagalog, is the national language. English is also widely used and is the medium of instruction in higher education.

How do you characterize standard Philippine English?

(1) Philippine English is RHOTIC, but the local /r/ is an alveolar flap, not an AmE retroflex. (2) It is syllabletimed, following the rhythm of the local languages; full value is therefore given to unstressed syllables and SCHWA is usually realized as a full vowel.

How do Philippines talk?

The two official languages of the Philippines are Filipino and English. Filipino is the national language, and the official status of English is a holdover from its time as a U.S. territory between the years of 1898 and 1946.

What are the examples of Philippine English?

Linguists have discussed the concept of “Philippine English” that has different variations of typical English words and here are a few examples of these words:

  • Chancing. …
  • Eat-All-You-Can. …
  • Salvage. …
  • Live-In. …
  • Bedspace. …
  • Double deck. …
  • Comfort Room. …
  • Boodle fight.
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21.01.2016

Why is the Philippines good in English?

4 Main Reasons Why Filipinos Speak English So Well. First and most important reason: The American influence on the education system. … They introduced a free education system and even sent teachers from America to help spread the language and made all teachers speak English in school.

How do you describe Philippine English?

Philippine English is a legitimate nativized variety of English. It is the language used by Filipinos in controlling domains such as science and technology, the judiciary, the legislature, bureaucracy, higher education, scholarly discourse, and the like.

How do you greet a Filipino elder?

Mano or pagmamano is an “honoring-gesture” used in Filipino culture performed as a sign of respect to elders and as a way of requesting a blessing from the elder. Similar to hand-kissing, the person giving the greeting bows towards the hand of the elder and presses their forehead on the elder’s hand.

How do you greet someone in Filipino?

Typically, people greet each other by saying, ‘kumusta kayo’ (‘how are you? ‘ in Tagalog). If the person you are greeting is older than you but within the same generation, it is expected that you will refer to that person as ‘kuya’ for males and ‘ate’ for females.

Is Filipino hard to learn?

Like in any language, there are factors that can make Filipino hard to learn. That said, it’s actually one of the easiest languages to study and master. That doesn’t mean that you can become fluent overnight, but compared to other languages, Filipino is a bit more straightforward.

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Is Filipino a dying language?

Not dying. But a lot of other languages in the Philippines have died off because of Tagalog. Many more languages are in the process of being diluted and outrightly extinguished as Tagalog imposes itself on native Philippine cultures.

What do they eat in Philippines?

50 dishes that define the Philippines

  • Adobo. No list of Filipino food would be complete without adobo. …
  • Lechon. The lechon is the most invited party guest in the Philippines. …
  • Sisig. Candice Lopez-Quimpo. …
  • Crispy pata. …
  • Chicken inasal. …
  • Taba ng talangka. …
  • Pancit Palabok. …
  • Bulalo.
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